A climber from Lincoln was close enough to see and hear the avalanche that killed at least 16 Sherpa guides on Mount Everest. It was the single deadliest accident ever on the world’s highest mountain. Today, Robert Kay is still at Everest base camp, as all climbing has stopped to mourn the dead, and with talk of Sherpa strikes and teams abandoning their climbs. On Sunday Kay talked by cell phone with Mike Tobias of NET News about the accident and what’s happening now on Mount Everest.  Read the interview and learn more about his expedition here:  http://bit.ly/1lC9PSs

A climber from Lincoln was close enough to see and hear the avalanche that killed at least 16 Sherpa guides on Mount Everest. It was the single deadliest accident ever on the world’s highest mountain. Today, Robert Kay is still at Everest base camp, as all climbing has stopped to mourn the dead, and with talk of Sherpa strikes and teams abandoning their climbs. On Sunday Kay talked by cell phone with Mike Tobias of NET News about the accident and what’s happening now on Mount Everest.  Read the interview and learn more about his expedition here:  http://bit.ly/1lC9PSs

A growing number of Nebraska teenagers are staying after school to write poetry. At a time when arts often take a backseat to other subjects in school, the spoken word poetry competition, Louder than a Bomb, provides a creative outlet. And for some students that outlet is critical. Read more about it and listen to some of the poetry as part of our story:  http://bit.ly/QCP3DR

A growing number of Nebraska teenagers are staying after school to write poetry. At a time when arts often take a backseat to other subjects in school, the spoken word poetry competition, Louder than a Bomb, provides a creative outlet. And for some students that outlet is critical. Read more about it and listen to some of the poetry as part of our story:  http://bit.ly/QCP3DR

Gordon-Rushville High School state speech champion Michael Barth performs his winning speech for the taping of an NET Television program.  The Nebraska School Activities Association had originally asked Barth to change his selection of poems because they dealt with gender identity and they felt it was too controversial.  After much criticism, the NSAA reversed its decision.  Watch Barth perform his poetry, and watch his discussion with the head of the NSAA about the controversy in this NET News story:  http://bit.ly/1q0AOW5.

Gordon-Rushville High School state speech champion Michael Barth performs his winning speech for the taping of an NET Television program.  The Nebraska School Activities Association had originally asked Barth to change his selection of poems because they dealt with gender identity and they felt it was too controversial.  After much criticism, the NSAA reversed its decision.  Watch Barth perform his poetry, and watch his discussion with the head of the NSAA about the controversy in this NET News story:  http://bit.ly/1q0AOW5.

atlasobscura

atlasobscura:

This weekend marks the start of one of the greatest natural spectacles in the world, when some 500,000 sandhill cranes descend on the Platte River Valley near Kearney, Nebraska. This is around 80% of the entire global population of sandhill cranes, and they stop off in the state to plump up on the plentiful food before continuing their migration north through to Canada, Alaska, and even as far as Siberia.

To celebrate this astounding avian event, there is the Crane Watch Festival (March 21 to 30) in Kearney and alongside Audubon’s Nebraska Crane Festival (March 20 to 24). Like the birds themselves, participants often travel long distances themselves, eager to view the swooping wings and crowded congregations of cranes. The birds have long used the Platte River area as a breeding ground, with crane fossils in the area dating back 10 million years. The sandhill cranes are most abundant from late March through to April and are joined by the migration of millions of other birds, including Whooping Cranes, shorebirds, and eagles. 

If you can’t make it to Nebraska, there’s an online Crane Cam at the Roe Sanctuary to see the river roost (Audubon advises checking in a sunrise and sunset for optimal online voyeurism).

For more on Nebraska’s great crane migration, visit Atlas Obscura…