We just finished a training with Judd Slivka and Steve Rice from the Missouri School of Journalism to use our smartphones and tablets as reporting tools. We got to play with Steller - an app that makes little online photo and video books.

Want to see what we tried? Here’s Grant Gerlock’s story on sweet corn and Jackie Sojico’s story about crab spiders. It’s a new thing for us so let us know what you think! And let us know if you’re already using Steller!

Virginia and Vanderbilt are competing for college baseball’s coveted championship at the College World Series in Omaha. Around TD Ameritrade Park, you’ll see the colors of each school proudly on display – black and gold for the Commodores, and orange and blue for the Cavaliers from Virginia.  However, baseball remains predominantly white.  Bobby Caina Calvan of The Heartland Project reports on how baseball is dealing with diversity issues in this story for NET News.  http://bit.ly/1l7eyot

Nearly every state in the country has seen increases in the number of farms that welcome city dwellers to play on their property, and subsequently, the revenue they bring in from visitors. In Nebraska, from 2007 to 2012, the amount of money farms made from agritourism went up more than 65 percent. Luke Runyon of Harvest Public Media looks at how farmers are increasingly capitalizing on tourism opportunities.  http://bit.ly/1nykgS2

Nearly every state in the country has seen increases in the number of farms that welcome city dwellers to play on their property, and subsequently, the revenue they bring in from visitors. In Nebraska, from 2007 to 2012, the amount of money farms made from agritourism went up more than 65 percent. Luke Runyon of Harvest Public Media looks at how farmers are increasingly capitalizing on tourism opportunities.  http://bit.ly/1nykgS2

During the spring of 1994, the world turned its back as the African country of Rwanda was ripped apart by a bloody civil war. 20 years later, a University of Nebraska-Lincoln professor is trying to help shed light on what’s been called a war the world forgot.  Ryan Robertson of NET News talks with professor Chantal Kalisa about her efforts. http://bit.ly/1w9XndW

"Diamond Dick” and “Bright Eyes” will join a host of historic Nebraska figures on the stage this week. The Chautauqua Festival – a week of notable history and dramatic storytelling – began in Norfolk Wednesday, and this year, some of the area’s youngest storytellers will be charged with conjuring up the past. Robyn Murray takes a closer look at the festival for NET News.  http://bit.ly/1lJiOuk

"Diamond Dick” and “Bright Eyes” will join a host of historic Nebraska figures on the stage this week. The Chautauqua Festival – a week of notable history and dramatic storytelling – began in Norfolk Wednesday, and this year, some of the area’s youngest storytellers will be charged with conjuring up the past. Robyn Murray takes a closer look at the festival for NET News.  http://bit.ly/1lJiOuk

Hemp is grown for fiber, seeds and oil all over the world, but has been a controlled substance in the U.S. for decades. A handful of farmers are planting the first hemp crop in decades despite federal regulations restricting the plant’s cultivation.  Luke Runyon of Harvest Public Media reports on hemp as a crop and how it has fared in Canada in these two stories:  http://bit.ly/1uCYHn7 and http://bit.ly/1lD3rbc.

Hemp is grown for fiber, seeds and oil all over the world, but has been a controlled substance in the U.S. for decades. A handful of farmers are planting the first hemp crop in decades despite federal regulations restricting the plant’s cultivation.  Luke Runyon of Harvest Public Media reports on hemp as a crop and how it has fared in Canada in these two stories:  http://bit.ly/1uCYHn7 and http://bit.ly/1lD3rbc.