How farmland changes possession over the next generation could alter the rural landscape in Nebraska and beyond. We’ll talk about it online with University of Nebraska-Lincoln Agricultural Economist Bruce Johnson and Harvest Public Media reporters today, Wednesday, June 31 at 8 p.m. CT: http://netnebraska.org/screening. Join us to watch the NET News special, Changing Lands, Changing Hands, about the trends of aging farmers and rising land prices and how they’re impacting the ag industry. During the show, add your questions and comments to a live discussion with Bruce Johnson, NET News reporter Grant Gerlock and other Harvest reporters. Changing Lands, Changing HandsWednesday, July 31, 8 p.m. CThttp://netNebraska.org/screening

How farmland changes possession over the next generation could alter the rural landscape in Nebraska and beyond. We’ll talk about it online with University of Nebraska-Lincoln Agricultural Economist Bruce Johnson and Harvest Public Media reporters today, Wednesday, June 31 at 8 p.m. CT: http://netnebraska.org/screening

Join us to watch the NET News special, Changing Lands, Changing Hands, about the trends of aging farmers and rising land prices and how they’re impacting the ag industry. During the show, add your questions and comments to a live discussion with Bruce Johnson, NET News reporter Grant Gerlock and other Harvest reporters. 

Changing Lands, Changing Hands
Wednesday, July 31, 8 p.m. CT
http://netNebraska.org/screening

The United Methodist church in the town of Julian in southeast Nebraska is dying. Only 14 people came to church last week; the average age of congregants is about 65 years old. In five to ten years, Pastor Sandy Streit said, the church won’t be here.

"So many churches are closing, all across Nebraska,” she said.

Rural Churches Struggle To Adapt To Changing Times

nprfreshair
nprfreshair:

Health writer Jo Robinson tells Dave Davies why we should eat dandelion:

[G]o out and find a dandelion leaf, rinse it well, and take a bite, and pay attention to your senses. For the first 10 seconds you won’t sense much at all, except you’ll notice that the leaf is hairy, and quite dense, quite chewy. Then, this bloom of bitterness [will] come at the roof of your mouth and go down your throat, and it’s going to stay there for about 10 minutes. And many of the wild plants that we used to eat had levels of bitterness similar to that dandelion. … Compared to spinach, which we consider a superfood, [a dandelion] has twice as much calcium, and three times as much vitamin A, five times more vitamins K and E, and eight times more antioxidants.


Some Nebraskans would agree; check out the story reporter Hilary Stohs-Krause did recently about foragers, or people who eat uncultivated food - like, say, dandelions. 

nprfreshair:

Health writer Jo Robinson tells Dave Davies why we should eat dandelion:

[G]o out and find a dandelion leaf, rinse it well, and take a bite, and pay attention to your senses. For the first 10 seconds you won’t sense much at all, except you’ll notice that the leaf is hairy, and quite dense, quite chewy. Then, this bloom of bitterness [will] come at the roof of your mouth and go down your throat, and it’s going to stay there for about 10 minutes. And many of the wild plants that we used to eat had levels of bitterness similar to that dandelion. … Compared to spinach, which we consider a superfood, [a dandelion] has twice as much calcium, and three times as much vitamin A, five times more vitamins K and E, and eight times more antioxidants.

Some Nebraskans would agree; check out the story reporter Hilary Stohs-Krause did recently about foragers, or people who eat uncultivated food - like, say, dandelions. 

'It Makes Us Feel Like Home': Reaching Out To Nebraska's Immigrant And Refugee Communities 

The foreign-born population of Nebraska has tripled since 1990, and almost 10 percent of working age Nebraskans weren’t born in this country. But despite all the attention given to the state’s changing demographics, integration remains a challenge.

Learn more in today’s Signature Story from Hilary Stohs-Krause.

futurejournalismproject
futurejournalismproject:

Catching up on the NSA’s Surveillance Program
As we adjust our tinfoil hats and try to make sense of the revelations that the US National Security agency has been monitoring email, cellular and other digital traffic for years now, we do a lot of reading.
It’s a fluid story with new facts coming to the fore about as fast as reporters can tweet them.
There are a lot of moving parts. First and foremost is news of NSA snooping on American activities via its PRISM program. Then there are denials by the Google, Apple, Facebook and Microsoft that they provided the Feds with back door access to their servers. Honest!
We’re not sure which is scarier: that they’re lying and actually do and did, or that they’re telling the truth and the government snuck in undetected.
While The Wall Street Journal appears quite happy with the program (Thank You for Data-Mining) and The New York Times quite angry (President Obama’s Dragnet), here’s some of what’s coming across our radar to help people get up to speed.
Chronicle Of Higher Education, Why Privacy Matters Even if You Have ‘Nothing to Hide’Privacy is often threatened not by a single egregious act but by the slow accretion of a series of relatively minor acts. In this respect, privacy problems resemble certain environmental harms, which occur over time through a series of small acts by different actors. Although society is more likely to respond to a major oil spill, gradual pollution by a multitude of actors often creates worse problems.
The Guardian, Edward Snowden: the whistleblower behind the NSA surveillance revelations (Video)Any analyst at any time can target anyone, any selector, anywhere. Where those communications will be picked up depends on the range of the sensor networks and the authorities that analyst is empowered with. Not all analysts have the ability to target everything. But I sitting at my desk certainly had the authorities to wiretap anyone from you or your accountant to a Federal judge to even the President if I had a personal e-mail.
New York Times, How the US Uses Technology to Mine More Data More Quickly “American laws and American policy view the content of communications as the most private and the most valuable, but that is backwards today,” said Marc Rotenberg, the executive director of the Electronic Privacy Information Center, a Washington group. “The information associated with communications today is often more significant than the communications itself, and the people who do the data mining know that.”
The Guardian, Boundless Informant: the NSA’s secret tool to track global surveillance dataA snapshot of the Boundless Informant data, contained in a top secret NSA “global heat map” seen by the Guardian, shows that in March 2013 the agency collected 97 [billion] pieces of intelligence from computer networks worldwide… The level of detail includes individual IP addresses.
Wall Street Journal, Technology Emboldened the NSAThe NSA’s advances have come in the form of programs developed on the West Coast—a central one was known by the quirky name Hadoop—that enable intelligence agencies to cheaply amplify computing power, U.S. and industry officials said. The new capabilities allowed officials to shift from being overwhelmed by data to being able to make sense of large chunks of it to predict events, the officials said. [Related: Why Metadata Matters, via the Electronic Frontier Foundation.]
Tips and Tricks
Wired, Hear Ye, Future Deep Throats: This Is How to Leak to the Press.
Fox News, A guide for journalists (and everyone else) to avoid government snoops.
Medill National Security Zone, Digital Security Basics for Journalists.
Slate, How to Shield Your Calls, Chats, and Internet Browsing From Government Surveillance
Bonus: Our Surveillance Tag is a deep dive into all things… err, surveillance.
Image: Feeling Safer? by John Cole.

futurejournalismproject:

Catching up on the NSA’s Surveillance Program

As we adjust our tinfoil hats and try to make sense of the revelations that the US National Security agency has been monitoring email, cellular and other digital traffic for years now, we do a lot of reading.

It’s a fluid story with new facts coming to the fore about as fast as reporters can tweet them.

There are a lot of moving parts. First and foremost is news of NSA snooping on American activities via its PRISM program. Then there are denials by the Google, Apple, Facebook and Microsoft that they provided the Feds with back door access to their servers. Honest!

We’re not sure which is scarier: that they’re lying and actually do and did, or that they’re telling the truth and the government snuck in undetected.

While The Wall Street Journal appears quite happy with the program (Thank You for Data-Mining) and The New York Times quite angry (President Obama’s Dragnet), here’s some of what’s coming across our radar to help people get up to speed.

Chronicle Of Higher Education, Why Privacy Matters Even if You Have ‘Nothing to Hide’
Privacy is often threatened not by a single egregious act but by the slow accretion of a series of relatively minor acts. In this respect, privacy problems resemble certain environmental harms, which occur over time through a series of small acts by different actors. Although society is more likely to respond to a major oil spill, gradual pollution by a multitude of actors often creates worse problems.

The Guardian, Edward Snowden: the whistleblower behind the NSA surveillance revelations (Video)
Any analyst at any time can target anyone, any selector, anywhere. Where those communications will be picked up depends on the range of the sensor networks and the authorities that analyst is empowered with. Not all analysts have the ability to target everything. But I sitting at my desk certainly had the authorities to wiretap anyone from you or your accountant to a Federal judge to even the President if I had a personal e-mail.

New York Times, How the US Uses Technology to Mine More Data More Quickly
“American laws and American policy view the content of communications as the most private and the most valuable, but that is backwards today,” said Marc Rotenberg, the executive director of the Electronic Privacy Information Center, a Washington group. “The information associated with communications today is often more significant than the communications itself, and the people who do the data mining know that.”

The Guardian, Boundless Informant: the NSA’s secret tool to track global surveillance data
A snapshot of the Boundless Informant data, contained in a top secret NSA “global heat map” seen by the Guardian, shows that in March 2013 the agency collected 97 [billion] pieces of intelligence from computer networks worldwide… The level of detail includes individual IP addresses.

Wall Street Journal, Technology Emboldened the NSA
The NSA’s advances have come in the form of programs developed on the West Coast—a central one was known by the quirky name Hadoop—that enable intelligence agencies to cheaply amplify computing power, U.S. and industry officials said. The new capabilities allowed officials to shift from being overwhelmed by data to being able to make sense of large chunks of it to predict events, the officials said. [Related: Why Metadata Matters, via the Electronic Frontier Foundation.]

Tips and Tricks

Wired, Hear Ye, Future Deep Throats: This Is How to Leak to the Press.

Fox News, A guide for journalists (and everyone else) to avoid government snoops.

Medill National Security Zone, Digital Security Basics for Journalists.

Slate, How to Shield Your Calls, Chats, and Internet Browsing From Government Surveillance

Bonus: Our Surveillance Tag is a deep dive into all things… err, surveillance.

Image: Feeling Safer? by John Cole.

Debate in the Nebraska Legislature is underway on a bill that would end capital punishment in the state. Watch the debate live on NET Television’s NET2, and participate in a live chat from 1:30 to 2:30 p.m. CT with legislative reporter Fred Knapp, news director Dennis Kellogg and reporter Bill Kelly, who recently produced a documentary on the history of the death penalty, "… until he is dead."

Check out a timeline of efforts to repeal the death penalty in Nebraska.

Brief background on this week’s debate:

The bill is sponsored by Sen. Ernie Chambers of Omaha, a longtime foe of the death penalty who has returned to the Legislature this year after being forced out for four years by term limits.

When a similar proposal was voted on in 2007, it was defeated on a vote of 25-24. But only 18 of the senators who voted then are still in the Legislature now.

The debate comes at a time when an increasing number of states have abolished the death penalty: from 2007 to the present, six states have done so, bringing the total number of states without capital punishment to 18. In some cases, the prohibition applies only to new sentences; those under current death sentences remain so.

Nebraska’s proposal to abolish the death penalty was advanced by the Judiciary Committee on a vote of 7-0, with one abstention. It would require 25 votes in each of three rounds of voting in the 49-member Legislature to pass. But it would require 30 votes to overcome an expected veto by Gov. Dave Heineman. 

NET News reporter Ryan Robertson took these shots while reporting in western Nebraska. He’s been traveling along Highways 26 and 92, south of Scottsbluff on the way to Bridgeport. Robertson reports that visibility is about half a mile, with near-whiteout conditions when the wind blows.

Several stretches of road have been closed, including: 

  • I-80 from Cheyenne, Wyoming to Sidney, Nebraska; 
  • Highway 71 from the Colorado border to Gehring, Nebraska; 
  • Portions of Highway 385 from Bridgeport, Nebraska to Alliance, Nebraska.

According to Weather.com, a “wild Wednesday” is in store for much of the Midwest, as parts of western Nebraska, much of South Dakota and even parts of Minnesota will see snow. Sleet and freezing rain are possible in eastern Nebraska.

Robertson has been in the panhandle reporting for stories about home health aids (one of the fastest-growing jobs in the U.S.) and about the state of film production in Nebraska.

Yeah, a significant minority (of homeless women) have substance abuse problems. They do. But does that mean that they’ve got to be raped? Does that mean they have to sleep in a park? We’re a more humane society than that.
Les Whitbeck, a professor at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln who’s been researching homelessness since the 1990s

Tune into NET Radio next Tuesday, March 12th, for a story on the rise of homeless women - including female veterans and women with children - from NET News reporter Hilary Stohs-Krause. You can find it online that day at the NET News website.