Dating Drought in the Nebraska Sandhills
The Plains have experienced prolonged, and in some places severe, drought during the last several years. But could drought ever make Nebraska’s Sandhills resemble the Sahara? Yes—and it has, several times before.  NET’s Ariana Brocious reports for the QUEST science project on unique research by University of Nebraska-Lincoln scientists that dates periods of drought in the Sandhills.  http://bit.ly/1nJudg0

Dating Drought in the Nebraska Sandhills

The Plains have experienced prolonged, and in some places severe, drought during the last several years. But could drought ever make Nebraska’s Sandhills resemble the Sahara? Yes—and it has, several times before.  NET’s Ariana Brocious reports for the QUEST science project on unique research by University of Nebraska-Lincoln scientists that dates periods of drought in the Sandhills.  http://bit.ly/1nJudg0

Cannabis has been in the news recently, with states like Colorado and Washington legalizing the recreational use of marijuana. But the cannabis plant is surprisingly versatile, and drugs aren’t the only thing produced from it. Paper, fabric, rope, animal bedding, and even building materials can all be made from cannabis that’s bred to have no drug value. This form of cannabis is called hemp, and one industry where it’s gaining a loyal following is food. Learn more in this QUEST science story from our partners in Ohio.

It probably isn’t the only empty beer can to have found its way to the floor of Zorinsky Lake in Omaha, Nebraska, and it probably won’t be the last.
But in the story of a domestic battle that has had wide-ranging ecological and economic consequences, it is certainly the most significant.
Addison Krebs, the Omaha Boy Scout who found the beer can on November 9, 2010, quickly became a hero to local biologists, ecologists, and water recreation enthusiasts — not just because of his efforts to clean the lake of litter but also because of what he discovered in the process.
Learn more in this QUEST Nebraska story from NET associate producer Jon Augustine.

It probably isn’t the only empty beer can to have found its way to the floor of Zorinsky Lake in Omaha, Nebraska, and it probably won’t be the last.

But in the story of a domestic battle that has had wide-ranging ecological and economic consequences, it is certainly the most significant.

Addison Krebs, the Omaha Boy Scout who found the beer can on November 9, 2010, quickly became a hero to local biologists, ecologists, and water recreation enthusiasts — not just because of his efforts to clean the lake of litter but also because of what he discovered in the process.

Learn more in this QUEST Nebraska story from NET associate producer Jon Augustine.

Here’s a fun story from QUEST Nebraska, a sustainability science collaborative of which NET is a member, that looks at the potential in the plant purslane:

Tough and Tasty: Recasting a Resilient Weed as a Wild Edible
In the middle of July 2012, the costliest drought in recorded history had Nebraska in its grip. Not a sprinkle of rain had fallen on Ross Brockley’s farm since June 4, and wouldn’t again until July 31. His half-dozen acres of vegetable gardens were green thanks only to constant watering by hand and diligent weeding performed by Brockley, his wife, Barb, and me, his lone farmhand.
Here in the southeast corner of the state, residents had spent their summer watching scorched soil crack and fields of crops turn brown. On this particular day I noticed a very healthy plant in an empty garden bed. It didn’t resemble anything I recognized as food so I pulled it up.
“Don’t do that!” Brockley yelped from across the garden. “I’m saving it,” he said sternly. “We’ll eat that.”
Really?

For more on wild edibles, check out this recent story from NET News reporter Hilary Stohs-Krause on urban foraging.

Here’s a fun story from QUEST Nebraska, a sustainability science collaborative of which NET is a member, that looks at the potential in the plant purslane:

Tough and Tasty: Recasting a Resilient Weed as a Wild Edible

In the middle of July 2012, the costliest drought in recorded history had Nebraska in its grip. Not a sprinkle of rain had fallen on Ross Brockley’s farm since June 4, and wouldn’t again until July 31. His half-dozen acres of vegetable gardens were green thanks only to constant watering by hand and diligent weeding performed by Brockley, his wife, Barb, and me, his lone farmhand.

Here in the southeast corner of the state, residents had spent their summer watching scorched soil crack and fields of crops turn brown. On this particular day I noticed a very healthy plant in an empty garden bed. It didn’t resemble anything I recognized as food so I pulled it up.

“Don’t do that!” Brockley yelped from across the garden. “I’m saving it,” he said sternly. “We’ll eat that.”

Really?

For more on wild edibles, check out this recent story from NET News reporter Hilary Stohs-Krause on urban foraging.

kqedscience

kqedscience:

World’s cutest frog will cure what ails you

Awww!!

npr
kqedscience:

Crazy living rock is one of the weirdest creatures we’ve ever seen
“The fact that this sea creature looks exactly like a rock with guts is not even the weirdest thing about it. It’s also completely immobile like a rock — it eats by sucking in water and filtering out microorganisms — and its clear blood mysteriously secretes a rare mineral called vanadium.”

kqedscience:

Crazy living rock is one of the weirdest creatures we’ve ever seen

The fact that this sea creature looks exactly like a rock with guts is not even the weirdest thing about it. It’s also completely immobile like a rock — it eats by sucking in water and filtering out microorganisms — and its clear blood mysteriously secretes a rare mineral called vanadium.”

wnycradiolab
Since Reed does not have a nuclear engineering department (or any engineering department), the staff comes from a broad selection of academic majors, primarily in the sciences but including nearly every major—from English and philosophy to psychology, religion, economics, and political science. According to one astonishing statistic, the Reed Research Reactor has more female reactor operators than all the other research reactors in the world…combined.
Do yourself a favor and read this Atlas Obscura article about the world’s only nuclear reactor operated by liberal arts undergraduates. (via wnycradiolab)